Click to continue

You are leaving www.rochefoundationmedicine.com. If you would like to continue to the Public site, www.rochefoundationmedicine.com/cancertesting please click to continue.

This website is a global information resource. It is intended for a public audience outside of the United States of America (US) who are interested in Foundation Medicine®. This site is not intended to provide medical advice and/or treatment guidance. This site is produced by Roche as the licensed distributor of Foundation Medicine® products outside of the US. This website is not country-specific and therefore may contain information which is not applicable to your country.

You are now leaving the Roche Foundation Medicine website. Links to all external sites are provided as a resource to our visitors. Hoffmann-La Roche Inc. ("Roche") accepts no responsibility for the content of these sites. Roche does not control these sites, and the opinions, claims, or comments expressed on these sites should not be attributed to Roche, except where indicated. We recommend that you consult with your local Roche representative to obtain more information about any Roche product or service.

Discover how comprehensive genomic profiling from Foundation Medicine may help open up treatment possibilities for you.1–3

Your cancer’s mutations

Cancer occurs due to changes in DNA and/or RNA called mutations that affect the way your cells work and grow.4,5

Each person’s cancer is unique because mutations differ in type and number and between cancer types.6,7

Even if you have the same type of cancer as someone else, your mutations may differ to theirs, and you may need different treatment.6–8

MUTATION AMUTATION BPERSON1PERSON2PERSON3Breast cancerBreast cancerLung cancerDNA strand

Your care team might suggest testing your cancer to find out what mutations you have in your DNA and/or RNA.

If certain mutations are found in your cancer cells your doctor may be able to give you a more precise treatment based on this finding. There might be cases where either no relevant mutation is found or no targeted treatment option is available for the mutation that has been identified. This is also valuable information, supporting further treatment planning.6–11

Precision medicine increases the likelihood you will find a targeted therapy, which may improve your chances of responding well or could mean that you experience fewer side effects.3

DRUG ADRUG BDRUG CDRUG DPERSON1PERSON2PERSON3PERSON4BRAFHER2 ALK METKRASNRASROS1NO MUTATIONSFOUNDDNADNADNADNA

Knowing the mutations in your cancer can help you and your doctor understand your treatment options and may help to personalise your treatment.6–11

Discuss with your doctor whether Foundation Medicine testing could be right for you.

What is comprehensive genomic profiling?

Genomic testing encompasses single biomarker testing, hotspot testing and comprehensive genomic profiling. They all test your cancer sample for mutations but work in different ways.

How does comprehensive genomic profiling help?

DNA strandNRASEGFRHER2BRAFFor example, this cancer cell DNA has four mutationsSpotlightNRASmissedEGFRfoundNRASfoundEGFRfoundSINGLE BIOMARKER TESTING OR HOTSPOT TESTINGCOMPREHENSIVE GENOMIC PROFILING

Knowing the mutations in your cancer can help you and your doctor understand your treatment options and may help to personalise your treatment

Discuss with your doctor whether Foundation Medicine testing could be right for you.

Our services

Foundation Medicine offers a high-quality portfolio of comprehensive genomic profiling services that can help you and your doctor better understand your treatment options.1,14–17

There are different tests available for patients with different types of cancer

Discuss with your doctor which test is recommended for your cancerAll solid tumoursBlood cancers and sarcomasTissue biopsyYour doctor will take a small sample of tissue from your cancer site using a needle, surgery, bone marrow biopsy or endoscopy. They will preserve this sample and will use it to run the comprehensive genomic profiling test.18–20 Liquid biopsyYour doctor will take a blood sample from a vein, usually in your arm or hand.21 They will collect two tubes of blood to send off for the test. The test will look for DNA from your cancer that is circulating in the blood.15,16

FoundationOne®CDx, FoundationOne®Liquid CDx and FoundationOne®Heme search for multiple mutations in your cancer sample to increase your chances of finding a more precise treatment and help personalise your cancer treatment plan.1,2,13–17,22–32 FoundationOne CDx and FoundationOne Liquid CDx are for patients with all types of solid tumours, e.g. lung, prostate or breast cancer.14,15 FoundationOne Heme is for patients with sarcoma and blood cancers such as leukaemia.17

Your care team will receive a comprehensive report which will include the details on your tumour profile and may identify therapies and clinical trials for you to discuss together.6–11,33

The following materials provide further information about FoundationOne CDx, FoundationOne Liquid CDx and FoundationOne Heme:

Your care team will receive a comprehensive report which will include the details on your tumour profile and may identify therapies and clinical trials for you to discuss together.6–11,33

Discuss with your doctor whether Foundation Medicine testing could be right for you.

M-IE-00000629
References
  1. Frampton GM et al. Nat Biotechnol 2013; 31: 1023–1031.
  2. Dong L et al. Curr Genomics 2015; 16: 253–263.
  3. Sicklick JK et al. Nat Med 2019; 25: 744–750.
  4. American Cancer Society Glossary. Cancer. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/content/cancer/en/cancer/glossary.html?term=cancer (Accessed October 2020).
  5. American Cancer Society Glossary. Mutations. Available at: https://www.cancer.org/content/cancer/en/cancer/glossary.html?term=mutation (Accessed October 2020).
  6. Baumgart M. Am J Hematol Oncol 2015; 11: 10–13.
  7. Schwaederle M, Kurzrock R. Oncoscience 2015; 2: 779–780.
  8. Heim D et al. Int J Cancer 2014; 135: 2362–2369.
  9. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Version 6.2020, June 2020. Available at: https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/nscl.pdf (Accessed August 2020).
  10. Ohashi K et al. Clin Cancer Res 2013; 19: 2584–2591.
  11. Rozenblum AB et al. J Thorac Oncol 2017; 12: 258–268.
  12. Naidoo J, Drilon A. Am J Hematol Oncol 2014: 10: 4–11.
  13. Suh JH et al. Oncologist 2016; 21: 684–691.
  14. FoundationOne CDx Technical Specifications, 2019. Available at: https://www.foundationmedicine.qarad.eifu.online/foundationmedicine/GB/en/foundationmedicine (Accessed October 2020).

  15. FoundationOne Liquid CDx Technical Specifications, 2020. Available at https://www.foundationmedicine.qarad.eifu.online/foundationmedicine/GB/en/foundationmedicine (Accessed October 2020).

  16. Woodhouse R et al. PLoS ONE 2020; 15: e0237802.
  17. FoundationOne Heme Technical Specifications, 2019. Available at https://www.foundationmedicine.qarad.eifu.online/foundationmedicine/GB/en/foundationmedicine (Accessed October 2020).
  18. Cancer Research UK. Needle Biopsy. Available at: https://about-cancer.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/breast-cancer/getting-diagnosed/tests-diagnose/needle-biopsy (Accessed October 2020).
  19. Mayo Clinic. Biopsy: Types of Biopsy Procedures Used to Diagnose Cancer. Available at: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cancer/in-depth/biopsy/art-20043922 (Accessed October 2020). 

  20. Cancer Research UK. Bone Marrow Test. Available at: https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/tests/bone-marrow-test (Accessed October 2020).

  21. Cancer Research UK. Blood Tests. Available at: https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/cancer-in-general/tests/blood-tests (Accessed October 2020).
  22. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. Soft Tissue Sarcoma. Version 2.2020, May 2020. Available at: https://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/PDF/sarcoma.pdf (Accessed October 2020). 

  23. Groisberg R et al. Oncotarget 2017; 8: 39254–39267.
  24. Gounder M et al. Presented at ASCO Annual Meeting 2017, Chicago (Illinois), USA: Abstract #11001 and oral presentation.
  25. He J et al. Blood 2016; 127: 3004–3014.
  26. Galanina N et al. Cancers (Basel) 2018; 11.pii: E11.
  27. Goodman AM et al. JCO Precis Oncol 2017. doi: 10.1200/PO.16.00004. 
  28. Heuck C et al. Blood 2015; 126: 369.
  29. Drilon A et al. Clin Cancer Res 2015; 21: 3631–3639.
  30. Rankin A et al. Oncologist 2016; 21: 1306–1314.
  31. Ross JS et al. Cancer 2016; 122: 2654–2662.
  32. Hirshfield KM et al. Oncologist 2016; 21: 1315–1325.
  33. Data on file: FoundationOne Liquid CDx Sample Report, 2020.